Bergerault Pedal Glock (Job No: 1202)

Bergerault have secured a place in my top ten bad designs with this pedal glockenspiel.  In order to minimise the number of removable parts and create a glock that is really quick and easy to assemble, they have this “great” idea of being able to adjust the length of the pedal.
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In itself this is a stupid thing to do, but they were forced to do so in order to make the rest of the design work.

The problem is that the legs fold out, and are secured in place first (albeit with diagonal braces that are also badly designed), and then the bottom bar is put in afterwards.  The bottom bar sits on little pins at either ends to enable it to rotate and thus becomes the pedal.  These pins are the problem, the bar has to be reduced in length to get it over,  then lengthened to “secure” it in place.

As a finishing touch, the method of holding the bottom/pedal bar at its full length is a throw back to the 1970’s, a wing screw and a nut.  I remember when certain makes of cymbal stand first started using nylon inserts, now they all do and with good reason as any percussionist will agree, finally something that consistently works.

The end result of all these stupefyingly bad design errors is an instrument that collapses as it is being wheeled about.

The next problem on the list are the connecting rods to the damper mechanism.  At the bottom they hook over little nylon wheels on the pedal.

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These just become detached while you wheel it about making an irritating noise and becoming hooked on things and being bent, except when they don’t become detached and then get bent when the instrument collapses.

The real problem with these rods is at the other end, where a leather belt is used to connect them to the damper bar.

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Yes that is a leather belt.  The photo is actually off another instrument.  This glock had a variety of materials including string, gaffa tape and cable ties.  Leather needs to be cared for, otherwise it dries out and degrades.  The buckles just rattle.

There are a lot more design issues with this glockenspiel, but those three were the problems on this instrument.  However it is not all bad, the notes do sound really good, and after all that is the most important part of an instrument.  It is just a shame that the rest of it is, well, basically shit.

So what did I do?  In reverse order: 
I took the damper mechanism out and sewed two webbing loops to replace the missing leather straps, and eliminate the rattling buckles.  There is no need for the length of these loops to be adjustable, and the webbing won’t degrade as quickly (3 years to 30+ years).

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One of the nylon wheels on the damper pedal was missing, so I made two new ones that prevent the connecting rods from coming off.  This instrument is never folded down.

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I made an additional bottom bar that fits behind the pedal bar.  This secures the legs in one position; they can neither be pushed in or pulled outwards.

Finally I put on better castors.
 

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