Musser M55 Vibraphone (Job No: 1251)

Of all the vibraphones on the market, this is the one to buy, especially if you want an instrument that you might be able to sell again in the future and get a decent price.

The Musser M55 is the bench mark vibe, when I look at other instruments from different manufacturers, I can see that they have essentially copied this design.

There are however problems with this vibe, mainly down to using poor materials in the frame, but you show me a major manufacturer who doesn’t make frames for percussion instruments as cheaply as possible.

If distributors don’t send me catalogues I am never going to see “new” instruments until they have broken, so consequently I’m not very up to date on Musser’s entire range of vibraphones, but I can’t see any reason to not buy this vibe with no added extras that cost extra money but don’t do anything or work.

Anyway, I last saw this vibraphone when I had a workshop in London, probably around 2003.  This is the players gigging vibe as opposed to the practice instrument at home, and it gets used a lot, but now it needs some attention.

The biggest problem is that the pedal moves all over the place, and as soon as I take a look, I can see why.

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Basically the screw that holds the pedal onto the bottom bar acts like a rasp on the very thin aluminium.  The main issue I have with the way this instrument is built is the thinness of the aluminium.  Structurally it is not up to the job, and this level of wear is a further reason why it is no good.

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What I did was make a new bit to replace the old bit – I have no idea what to call the extra bit of square tube that Musser put on the underside of the main cross bar, the piece that makes the pedal sit at the correct height.  (A classic case of bodging it when you make a mistake on the drawing board, which never gets changed.  I reckon that even Musser believe the excuse for it’s existence – but let’s face it, it’s a cock up!)

So yes, I made a new “bit” and enlarged the holes through where the pedal attaches.  Then I made a nylon insert through which the pedal fixing bolt passes.

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This was made so that it is held in place by the ally plate on top and the “bit” underneath.  Because the nylon is now proud of both surfaces of the cross bar, the pedal rotates silently and smoothly – no metal to metal contact.  The bolt is now supported over its length, so the pedal cannot twist backwards.

I was unwell at the time, so didn’t take enough pictures, because my brain was like custard.  I did find other problems but I will undoubtedly cover them in the future on other vibes.

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