Bergerault Pedal Glock (part 2) (Job No: 1239)

All the metal work needed to stop this Bergerault pedal glock collapsing at every inopportune moment was made in 1239 Bergerault pedal glock (pt 1).

I have a few golden rules when it comes to making and repairing percussion instruments, for instance it has to sound good, work, last, etc. In application I also have considerations to make and using experience I identify and remove potential problems before they happen.

This glockenspiel has two examples, first on the list are rattles.  Has it not dawned on the manufacturers that percussion instruments are played by hitting them, and that due to their very nature of being musical instruments they vibrate.  So anything that can work loose and vibrate will do.  Why on earth then would you choose to use a buckle on a percussion instrument?

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Needless to say, they go in the bin!

The next problem is the damper pedal which just hangs off the end of the connecting rod.  Of course this is fine if the instrument never moves and of course the world has a perfectly flat uniform surface.  The damper bar is sprung, so any movement on the instrument will cause movement in the springs – they bounce.  Low and behold the pedal becomes detached, bits snap off, get bent….

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It is only because I am also a quantum physicist as well as an instrument maker, who does a bit of neuro surgery on the side, that I am capable of coming up with solutions to these problems.  Webbing loops instead of buckles, and I remake the pedal connector with bigger sides so the pull rod cannot come off (which is fine if the instrument always stays set up). 

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With those bits of idiocy resolved, the instrument can be assembled and finished.

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