Tag: 751

Premier 751 For Sale (Job#1623)

SOLD

In my possession I have a really nice example of a Premier 751 vibraphone for sale complete with a full set of cases which are also in excellent condition.  The video below looks at the instrument in detail including a section of higher quality audio recording so you can listen to it.


As can be seen from the video, I have had to do some work to the instrument to get it into perfect working order repairing the damage caused by an instrument repairer! There are some minor issues that are irreparable but I have mitigated these with the exception being the holes drilled through the legs and the damage caused to the paintwork by the oversized casters. These casters were probably fitted for a valid reason at the time, but the new owner would be advised to change them.

The price takes into consideration the overall condition of the instrument in comparison to the all the instruments that I have worked on over the years. As I state in the video, it looks almost new. There has been a bit of repainting, but there are hardly any tell tale scratches which are an indication of how much the vibraphone has been thrown in and out of cars, or not.

In addition to the overall condition of the vibe, it also has a new motor system which immediately inflates the price since these are a costly investment. The vibraphone also comes with the aforementioned cases which retail at £600.

As I have indicated, I will accept offers. If you are interested contact me here: email

Fitting My Replacement Motor System for Premier Vibes

These are the fitting instructions for the replacement motor systems that I produce for Premier 701 or 751 vibraphones.

As you can see from the video I have designed the system so it is easy to fit to your instrument. There is a reason behind every feature of the product which is the result of over a decade of development. Each time I have fitted new motors to Premier vibraphones, modifications have been made to the carriage and the assembly. The result is that I have done pretty much all the work for you, so all you need to do is drill a few holes and use a screwdriver. The picture below shows the tools that I used.

Of course the downside of all these hours spent problem solving is that I expect to be paid for all my work. All of my development costs like this, whatever the instrument, are spread across at least ten customers in order to keep the costs for the individual. I do this because I am not greedy, I have personal ethics, and I like to be fair. So if you are not happy with that and choose to steal my ideas to save yourself a few quid, then may you burn in hell!

The photo above shows the kit. Everything you need, plus a extras, are in the kit. Even the correct sized drill bits (to avoid any mistakes) and a small allen key are included.  Three different sized belts so that you can determine the best fit and a long kettle lead.

I fit an IEC C14 socket to the motor and a C15 plug on the lead for versitility – you can use the lead with most electrical music equipment which has a low current draw.  Obviously I fit the correct fuse, but the size of the cable will only handle 10 amperes.  I make the cable detachable so that you don’t wind the cable around the end of the instrument.  This is possibly the most common thing I see with vibraphones and it is bad practice especially if you then go on to pack the instrument down.  When combined with the poor earth continuity readings that I find on most mass produced instruments the result is a potential death trap.  The problem you face is that most instruments have the cables permanently attached, so as per usual I find myself going in the opposite direction to convention because of what I think are more important reasons than preventing you from losing the cable.

Fitting Photograhs:

Do a better job than this photo! Keep the ribbon cable flat if possible.  Do the cable tie closer to the motor first, then the outer one.  The control panel can be orientated so that the cable fits neatly and you only have a little strip showing along the outer edge of the note rail.  Either cable tie this section, use gaffa tape or just leave it – this depends on how rough you are when packing the instrument down.

If you don’t need to take off the transom bar, it will be very difficult to drill the holes for the cable ties. For this reason I have included two tie blocks in the kit. They are very sticky, but I would advise removing the resonator pad and giving the metal a good clean and then de-grease with mentholated spirits first, this way they will definitely stick around for the long term! The cable ties thread through both opposing sides of the pad and it would probably be easier to thread them before sticking them down.

The carriage for the Premier 751 is longer because of the hole to allow access for the damper bar adjustment screw. This screw I replace and is included in the pack. Therefore the 751 motor carriage takes longer to make which is why it costs more.  For ordering the motor system, send an and include your name and address so that I can send you an invoice.

How to change damper bar felt

When I overhaul vibraphones, my approach is to fix everything that I find wrong, striving to make the instrument better than it has ever been. This process takes time, sometimes even months of work as I deal with a long list of minutia. In an attempt to avoid repetition (although that is inevitable), I try to pick the pertinent aspects of the repair rather than me filming and writing, and you watching and reading the same thing every time. For the same reasons I have coloured this introductory text blue (aren’t I thoughtful!)

In this video I am demonstrating how I go about changing the damper felt on a vibraphone.  The instrument is a Premier 751, but it could equally be any set of vibes.  In fact the same approach can be applied to all percussion instruments where the damping mechanisms allow.  However a word of warning, if you are considering changing the damper felt on a pedal glockenspiel or a set of crotales, etc a great deal more thought is required concerning the setting up of the instrument after the felt has been changed and is therefore work that is probably best left to an experienced professional.


Premier 701 Vibraphone Overhaul (Job No: 1351)

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This is the second of the three Premier 701 vibraphones that I am simultaneously working on and is therefore episode two in the, “aging Premier vibes” mini series. If this blog determined what I do in my workshop, the first episode would be the last in the series as it is the youngest of the three vibes. However that is not how it happens, so this vibraphone is actually the oldest of the three.

The most obvious aesthetic difference of this vibe compared to the other two is that at this time Premier were still polishing the resonators. The motor unit has changed, gone is the two cone gearbox design with the push/pull rod that to change the speed (the gearbox that was forever breaking) replaced by a three stage pulley.

As intimated, losing the gearbox was probably done for reliability but we do start to see the introduction of cost savings and the loss of the gearbox would almost certainly have saved Premier a bob or two.

The external note rails were still being polished, but the inner two are now being painted. However the rest of the components are from the original patterns: black balls in the damper bar, white end pegs, and chunky fanshaft bushes.

When I overhaul vibraphones, my approach is to fix everything that I find wrong, striving to make the instrument better than it has ever been. This process takes time, sometimes even months of work as I deal with a long list of minutia. In an attempt to avoid repetition (although that is inevitable), I try to pick the pertinent aspects of the repair rather than me filming and writing, and you watching and reading the same thing every time. For the same reasons I have coloured this introductory text blue (aren’t I thoughtful!)


This Vibraphone is generally tired, after all it is getting old. As I well know, once you pass thirty your body starts to acquire various aches and pains, now passed forty I am well aware that my body just doesn’t work as well as it did. This vibe is older than me, so it is no wonder that it is falling apart.

As you know I started working on all the resonators which is mainly a job of cleaning up and replacing loose rivets, but there can be issues as seen in (Job No: 1354). On that instrument the whole row of tubes were out of alignment, whereas on this instrument the damage to one of the tubes was just cosmetic.

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Premier 751 Vibraphone (Job No: 1327)

There are a lot of vibraphones coming through my workshop at the moment, including the Premier 751. In fact, when I pause to think about it, I seem to have been working continuously on various aspects of the Premier vibraphones for nearly a year now. Whether I have been developing moulds for reproducing the rubber parts, making jigs for the metal components, or working on whole new assemblies, there always seems to be something going on with these vibes.

What I find is that work comes in waves; for months all I seem to have worked on are vibes, before that I just seemed to be doing timpani, then I had three sets of tubular bells in a row… So this is what has happened, and the result is that my stock of parts is being used up. I keep stating that these parts are obsolete because the instrument isn’t produced any more, so now I have been forced to come up with alternative solutions which all take a lot of time over prolonged periods.

Instead of focusing on particular details, with this post I decided to give more of an overview of the work I do. What you will see in the video is that jobs are never as straight forward as you would think, and soon I find myself surrounded by bits…


Premier 751 Buying Guide

Premier Percussion’s 751 or 701 vibraphones are great instruments despite being often disparaged. It is true that I think there are some elements of the design that are flawed, but I am an instrument maker and I always strive for perfection – believe me that can be a curse (ask my future wife about it if you ever meet her!) However on the whole, as I have already stated, I think they are great and have a lot of positives.

First and foremost, the note bars sound good. Yes the tuning could be better, but you show me a vibe that is tuned properly off the shelf. Tuning can be improved whereas tonality and sustain cannot, and the 751 has both aspects in abundance. This is unsurprising to me since the note bars are more similar to the Deagan’s vibraphones than the Musser’s which are the vibes in vogue today.

To this day they are probably one of the most portable set of vibes, although they are made to be carried not wheeled about, and it is the wheeling around that I think causes a lot of the problems that I have to fix.

Considering the lightweight and portable design of the frame, they last well. I am frequently seeing instruments that are over 50 years old and still working! I would probably die of shock if any of the shite made today by other manufacturers comes in to be serviced when I am in my nineties. That would be Karma I suppose.

The 751 vibraphone has not been made now for a good number of years which means that the only way of acquiring one is to buy it second-hand. I often receive emails asking for advice on what problems to look out for when buying , so I have made this buying guide to give some pointers.


If you are looking at buying a 751 or 701 vibraphone, take a pad and make some notes, count up the missing parts and take some photographs. Then when you want to know roughly how much the repair bill will be, you will have the correct information. All of the parts are obsolete; some I have made direct replacements and some I have re-designed, but all take time to make and fit, and it is the time that ultimately costs you the money. When I compare the average repair bill against other instruments, it is the 751/701 vibe that has the widest range in value, and this is a direct consequence of obsolete parts.

Premier 751 Vibraphone (part 2) (Job No: 1279)

This Premier 751 Vibraphone is one of those instruments that seemed to have everything wrong with it; the frame was out of shape, major elements like the damper system were broken, and the motor was hanging off.  In 1279: Premier 751 vibe (pt 1) I discussed the structural work that I have done, starting from the ground up, and ending with the commencement of a new damper system.

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Most of the work in making a new damper system is in the set up, by which I mean how this intrinsically simple system is fitted to the instrument. This is discussed in greater detail in 1260: Premier 701 vibe (pt 2) and it can be seen that I take great care in ensuring that everything is set parallel so that when the damper is used, it rotates freely around its fulcrum points. In reality, because I do not compromise on the quality of materials, the felt I use is of exceptional quality and soft enough to compress around any localised discrepancies. Therefore ironically I have more leeway in the set up of the damper bar, but I cannot guarantee that the same felt will be used from now on, and if a job is worth doing, do it properly. Of primary importance is how the bar makes contact with the underside of the note bars, this is it’s function after all; it needs to be simultaneous across the entire range (left to right or up and down the vibe) as well as between the naturals and accidentals (front to back). So as well as getting everything mechanically efficient, it is this element that I want to get right. I have only ever seen an adjustable system on an Adams vibraphone, and it struck me as a very good idea, especially considering their history of inaccuracy when mass producing components; needless to say despite their system being adjustable, no one had set it up properly before I finally got hold of it, but that is a question of mass produced instruments being assembled by minimum wage factory workers.

The final part of the damper system is joining it to the pedal. In the photograph above I have dropped plumb lines down so that I can mark where, along the damper bar, I want the connections placed. This is an example as to why, when I built the workshop, I put a raised floor in. Besides the added comfort of standing all day on a wooden floor, as opposed to the great discomfort (and harm) from standing on concrete, installing a floor meant that I could get the whole area perfectly flat using a laser level. With a horizontal surface to work off, I know that every time I drop a plumb line down off an instrument, it will be perpendicular to the floor. In practice this means that the two rods that pull the damper are now both pulling at the same rate in the same direction – this is so difficult to achieve that most manufacturers opted to have one pull rod and a central pedal.

I suppose the big question is why do I bother? There are several perspectives to the answer. A vibraphone player generally has an indirect contact with the instrument, they use mallets or bows to generate the sound. To control the sustain and decay on (and in) the whole they rely on a mechanical system. It is my task to give them the very best tools to do their job, so I want the damper system to be expressive as possible and I want consistency across every note. When I say this is my job, it seems blindingly obvious why I go to great lengths to get things perfect. The counter is also true: if a vibraphone does not have this done by a maker or repairer, then they are not doing their job. Furthermore, it is in my nature to be extremely particular and exacting, which why I became an instrument maker, but despite the lack of financial reward the main rewards are in job satisfaction. Over time, to achieve the same level of job satisfaction and therefore reward, I have to aim higher and higher and only my very best work gives that satisfaction. Consequently I always do my best, still living to the Scout promise after all these years!

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Whilst I was working on this vibe, I use the opportunity to try out my moulding system for replacing the note pegs. There are more details on this kit in 1264: Premier Vibe Note Pegs. There was also a new motor system fitted (1101: Premier vibe motor conversion) and some new alternative spare parts that I have made. In the photograph below the motor speed control can be seen tucked away inside the top transom, and two new note cord hoop mouldings. The Two cord hoop mouldings I have made in bronze as opposed to plastic, so I will be very surprised if they ever break again. They are a little bit more expensive than the originals were, but the originals are obsolete and I have run out, but my replacements are far superior, but it is the unit cost which has prevented me from replacing all of them.

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Premier 751 Vibraphone (part 1) (Job No: 1279)

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Here is a Premier 751 Vibraphone in a bit of a state, sent in to me to be made usable.  Whenever I get an instrument like any of the Premier 7 series vibes, I always ask how the instrument used.  This is because I have invariably seen the same model instrument many times before and have a good knowledge how they break.  For example, the resonators on the 751 (or 701) vibraphone are fixed in two points at the low end, but at the high end there is no mechanical fixing, they simply rest on a transom.  Using gravity is fine on most instruments for holding resonators in place because of their mass, but to then expect gravity to be a structural component of an instrument’s design and resist the much larger forces of motion and mechanics is simply ridiculous.  And yet I see it used all the time, by every manufacturer and even overlooked in most renovations, which is how I have come to the conclusion that either nobody knows what they are doing, or that they are making things to fail to generate future income.

So to get back to this vibraphone, what has resulted is that when viewed from above, the frame has become rhomboid and when viewed from the front it has become trapezoid.  If this frame distortion is ignored, the instrument will eventually just die, but with a simple sub frame the problems can be rectified.  The frames I make have a life time guarantee, that’s my lifetime, not the life time of a product (which is up to the moment it breaks), so essentially they are extremely strong, strong enough to be used to pull a frame back into alignment as opposed to just retaining it in a distorted shape.  Alignment of an instrument is very important for longevity, especially when there are moving components like on a vibraphone.

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Everyone has a method of working, I start at both ends; from the ground up and the top down.  What I am doing is working from the known points and verifying that those datum lines are correct.  By the ground up I mean the contact with the floor, and the top down is the players interaction.  In order to get fit a subframe to Premier vibes it is necessary to remove the two lower transoms, this makes it easier to also fit new casters.

Another constantly recurring problem with most percussion instruments is the material used to make the frame out of.  Aluminium is used because it is “light weight”, but it only saves weight if the component is designed properly to overcome its low strength, mostly manufacturers just use more of it to add strength which is expensive and heavier than steel.  Premier have deviated from the norm and actually used an extrusion; all the little grooves massively increasing the components bending resistance.  Where the casters are bolted on, Premier have even used the plastic end cap as an internal support to the tube to resist the tube crushing and wear on bolt holes.  In fact on most of the Premier vibraphones I see, it is the steel note rails and not the aluminium that is visibly bent.

However, the problem I encounter when modifying an aluminium frame is holding the fixings in place.  To simply drill a hole and put a steel bolt through is never going to last; the aluminium extrusion will compress introducing a gap, therefore movement, and therefore wear on the holes thus rendering the whole exercise a complete waste of time, effort and the customers money.  This means that I have to make a whole range of subsidiary components to support the bolts which will affix the proposed frame modification, which takes careful thought, time and always some compromises to keep the ultimate cost down.

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The final subframe looks very simple, but it is doing many jobs:  It holds the four casters parallel to the ground, fixes the width of the instrument, pushes the back two casters outwards to remove the frame twist, pulls the frame back square so that the note bed is horizontal, and holds it there during use of the damper pedal, and finally it increases the structural strength of the whole vibraphone so that it can withstand being wheeled around the buildings where it lives and is played.  Like all my solutions, I use the minimum number of wing nuts to reduce the players time when setting up or packing down; three nuts and the legs can be folded away.  The only downside is that one has another component to carry, but only because I retained the original pedal bar to save money.

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With the frame problems now rectified I turn my attention to the next area, and look at the damper bar.  It is immediately apparent that there is a problem – one of the leaf springs has broken.  They always break, the constant bending work hardens the steel making it increasingly brittle until it snaps.  The thread in the plastic ball is stripped, and the ball is cracked.  The felt is more like carpet than felt, and the bar itself is bent.  Each of these problems can be repaired, but then you would still be left with an ineffectual damper system which has components that are prone to failure, and that is not what my customers want back as a completely refurbished instrument.  Additionally my aim is always to return instruments that will give years if not decades of use.

Having made a new damper system recently on another vibraphone (1260: 701 vibe damper (pt 2)), it was a good opportunity to repeat the process.  I am constantly reviewing how I do things and looking for improvements, or developing methods to make the process quicker and cheaper without compromising quality.  This was no exception, I tweaked a few aspects of the design and the construction but essentially it is the same as before.  By increasing the width of the bar I have increased the surface area of the note in contact with the felt which results in much better damping.  On an operational level, because the bar is hinged, and because I have designed it, there is minimal horizontal travel as the bar travels through its arc.  The original design, because of the leaf springs, shifts left to right as the bar is pulled down and up; this lateral movement not only drags the notes around, but from a musical perspective it creates woolliness in the damping.

The original Premier damper system, is an ugly, inelligent and inefficient design solution that I would never have been happy with, but that is essentially my gripe with most instruments and all of the brand manufactures; they put into production badly designed products which are then made cheaply and badly, and endorsed by high profile musicians.  Even worse, a high profile musician “designs” and markets a new instrument.  Whilst musicians know when they are playing on a nice instrument, they generally have very little idea as to what makes the instrument good besides the obvious.  I have spent decades learning about materials, mechanical engineering, acoustics, etc, and I have more questions than ever.  It’s like the drummer that wants to be a front man – the musician that wants to make instruments.  Why don’t they start with something easier to understand and simpler to make like a violin or a guitar for their private enjoyment?

This repair continues in 1279: Premier 751 (pt 2)

Premier 701 Vibraphone (part 1) (Job No: 1260)

This whole job is a bit embarrassing, not for me, but for all the other people who have been associated with this instrument before it ended up in my workshop.  Most of all it is embarrassing for the man who bought as a birthday present to his son, discovered a problem with lack of damping, and ten months later the son is nearly another year older!

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I do have the notes and resonators, but as can be seen the damper bar is missing – taken to be repaired.  So the job is to sort out the lack of damping.

The damper bar on these Premier vibes is rubbish and now all the parts are obsolete.  Why anyone would go to the trouble of remaking parts to get a badly designed assembly to work is a mystery to me.  The main problem with the design is the leaf springs which work harden over time and snap like the top of a tin can when you wiggle it to get it off.  I could make new springs in an hour, but why make something that is destined to break?  Furthermore, because I don’t have the original damper bar I don’t know what condition the ball joints are in, or if the bar is straight which are the other major issues.

Immediately when the instrument was delivered I noticed a problem.

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The bottom bar which carries the pedal, and around which the pedal rotates, has been welded to the frame.  How could I resolve any damping problems if I were to ignore the point of operation?  First big question therefore is why the damper bar was removed for repair when the whole instrument should have been taken.

I know why the damper bar was welded into place.  As can be seen from the photo, several attempts have been made to sort the problem.  It’s unbelievably bad and so obvious only someone stupid would have failed to realise that the pedal acts against springs which therefore will try and rotate the tube.  So the two screws in the ends didn’t work because they have created a nice axle.

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The first thing to do is to make a new bar, because the only way to that one off is with an angle grinder.  Because the damper bar and springs slide onto the tube and are riveted in place the ends need to be both the same diameter of the tube and removable.

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I put flats on the under side of these caps which sit on a little square bar welded to the leg frames to stop the rotation.

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Whilst I was welding, I put mounting plates on for the casters – in the picture above it can be seen what the previous person did.

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The damping system will not work if the legs aren’t attached to the top frame or the frame to the note rails.

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The whole thing needed to be removed straightened and refitted, so that the top and bottom are now both solid, all I then had to do was join the two halves, except the holes don’t even line up.

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I think that the owner said that he bought the instrument from a school – I certainly hope that this is not the work of the metal work teacher, but I suspect it is.  As a digression, I applied to do teacher training in the early 2000’s, become a craft and design teacher; I was told that I was under qualified.  You don’t need a bloody degree to make something square!

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That was hot, hard work!  Fire and brawn to pull the thing straight.  The frame that has been built (which actually needs to be binned) is massively heavy 6mm steel!  I would make a shelter out of this stuff and still guarantee it for life.

Finally I can assemble the instrument and begin to look at the actual damper bar which will be in 1260 (pt 2).

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Premier 751 Vibraphone (Job No: 1179)

A Premier 751 vibraphone in to have a service.  Particular issues are inconsistent damping and note sustain.

A quick look at the frame revealed no major issues, however the fan shafts were very noisy, so I started here.
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The Premier 751 Vibe is no longer made, so all spare parts are now obsolete.  When Premier stopped making this vibraphone, I was invited over to buy all the remaining spares.  Therefore if I don’t have it, then its unlikely that anyone else will – unless of course that they don’t do many of these very common vibes!

One of the problems with the fan shafts being noisy is the central bearing (pictured above).  In order to get this on the fan shaft (because it can’t go past the butterflies), the top of the bearing is sliced through, therefore it loses structural rigidity.  This becomes a real problem when it is forced into the resonators; forced because they were made a little bit too long, so they have to be bent to get them in.  The same thing happens at the low end, but there the bearing doesn’t have to be cut.  This bend creates a pinch point on the rotating shaft, and an ambiguity in positioning, this is where the noise comes from.  Thankfully because these spare have run out, I now have no option but to make a replacement, which means that I may as well solve the problem permanently.

First on the list of improvements is better material, I use a low friction nylon.  I would have used PTFE, but in
this instance it needs to hold a thread.  The originals are moulded plastic, so they start with a structure and add bits to the design for strength, because mine are cut from a sheet of material, I start with a block and remove bits where needed, but there is still a big increase in mass.  Therefore mine are way stronger than they need to be (which means that they should never need changing).

There is of course another benefit.  These bearings are now made when needed, and modified so that the holes are all aligned correctly so that the fan shaft runs true.  They are essentially matched sets.

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The central bearing is made in two halves and held together with machine screws, but all of the bearings have a little hole for oiling.  This is the complete opposite to progress – I have copied a concept used on vibes made in the 1930’s in the UK (where we invented engineering and are still unsurpassed), all I have done is used modern materials.

The only problem is that they don’t fit!  I went through several designs a few years ago, trying to make them so that would go in the space available, but they all failed.  Since then, I decided simply to increase the available space.  This means cutting the resonator tubes, and unlike every other time I have seen a tube modified, I remove the tubes from the set to work on them and not damage all the others.  It’s a no brainer!

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As can be seen above, I have increased the chord length of the cut out, and its depth.