Tag: parts

Premier Vibe Note Pegs (Job No: 1264)

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This little item has been causing issues for a long time now!  It is the rubber note peg cap off a Premier 751 vibraphone, but it has been used on several generations of Premier’s vibraphones.  Of course Premier stopped producing the 751 and the 701 vibes a long time ago now; it was probably around 2008 when Premier asked me to come and relieve them of all their obsolete spare parts which had been hanging around in their factory for years.

The root cause of the problem with these note peg caps is difficult to avoid; rubber degrades in light and air.  Ultra violet light, but mainly Ozone that are main the culprits, so the only way for you to prolong the life of them on your vibraphone is to remove these two factors.  So from now on practice in the pitch black within a vacuum; I hear that NASA have space suits going cheap now they are being undercut by China.

Back in 2008 I also obtained access to Premier’s tooling for injection moulding these parts.  I dutifully went off and requested quotes from rubber moulding companies to have some made up.  The received quotations were ridiculously high, with the quantities ridiculously large that I just could never see a time when I could afford the £47,000+VAT to have 20,000 made.  Obviously they did not want to make them using the old moulds, and new moulds would also be too expensive, so a non commercially produced method for making the parts had to be developed.

My solution was to use a two part synthetic “rubber” that can be mixed and injected by hand into a mould.  This brought the required investment down to around £1000, which is still a lot of money in my world!  Along with the financial investment into tools and materials, I have also had to invest a lot of time in learning how to use them.

This whole project has, in reality, been a massive spanner in the works – whole days would be lost producing a pattern or some “bit” I needed, only to discover the next day that it wouldn’t work.  This continuous distraction has been the reason for my absence!  Below is a highly condensed video of how I went about it.


Having finally made a sufficient number moulds for me to replace all the pegs on a vibraphone, I had eventually got to the position when I could completely use up the two pots of gunk I will use when making up the kits and thus discover whether my idea is actually cost effective.  Because the original note pegs cost £3.75 each, but are sold (by me) singly due to their scarcity, I certainly want my replacements to be cheaper than this, but what I really want is to get a whole instrument done for less than £200, which is a unit cost of £2.25.  The material costs for one pair of pots are currently £19, so I had to form more than 6 to beat the cost of the original spares, and more than 8 to achieve my target.  In reality I got 20 note pegs reproduced out of one pair of pots which is fantastic, so the main costs associated with the job, will be the moulds.

Replacement Kit for Premier 750 series Note Peg Caps.

Initial Kit at currently £60 contains: 2 moulds, 1 x 50ml part A (black), 1 x 50ml part B (white), 10 mixing pots, 10 x 5ml syringes, 20 tea spoons, 20 nitrile gloves, 5 cocktail sticks, 2 Kebab skewer.

Refill kit at currently £20 contains the same minus the two moulds.

Below is an instructional video on how to use the kit from preparation to completion.


…The Anatomy of a Kettle Drum

(Every Percussionist Should Know…)
…The Anatomy of a Kettle Drum.

Life is easier if you can tell the doctor that your left little toe hurts, from there one could get even more specific; the top right corner of the nail.  It’s the same when customers talk to me about their instruments.  Most instrument are pretty simple, but the modern timpani are not, so I thought it was time that I create a guide.

Below is a drawing I have reproduced and altered from an old Premier spare parts manual.  I have only used Premier because I had it readily to hand.  Regardless of the make and model, essentially the component parts of a kettle drum are generic.

I can’t be bothered learning all the various names or numbers that manufacturers come up with to differentiate themselves from the others.  If you need a part, explain what you need, and I will worry about part numbers – you receive what you actually need.

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  1. Tuning key – this replaces the old T handles.
  2. Tuning bolt, not a T bolt – believe it or not they look like the letter T.
  3. Insulation washer.  I use PTFE, Premier have nylon semi-spherical washers.
  4. Indicies indicate the note or pitch on a tuning gauge (don’t worry most tuning gauges are simply rubbish – they are the bane of my life! (exaggeration)).
  5. Head, whether made of plastic or skin it is a timp head.  Skins were the thugs in the late 70’s that wore Doc Martins shoes, bomber jackets and had Nazi swastikas tattooed on their faces (I bet they regret those tattoos n6.  ow!)
  6. Bearing edge
  7. Tuning Lug.  Lug is a universal engineering term for anything that protrudes out.  I can’t stop thinking of the kid at school who had sticking out ears…
  8. Counter Hoop.  This holds the flesh hoop and enables tuning.
  9. Suspension Hoop.  It suspends the bowl.  Cheaper drums do away with this part and attach the struts directly to the bowl.
  10. Bowl.  Made of silver, copper, glass fibre, aluminium or ceramic, on timps a bowl is a bowl.
  11. Strut or Leg.
  12. Knee.
  13. Grip rod.
  14. Clutch.
  15. Pedal and pedal cover.
  16. Toe and more specifically the Heel.  Think about it, the toe’s stick out, and the heel is like that part of your shoe.
  17. Pedal Arm.
  18. Base Casting.
  19. Caster.  Premier have the Tilt Stem attached.  A wheel is a wheel, it’s the round thing, the complete unit is a caster.  Ask for a wheel, you get a wheel!
  20. Central Pull Rod.  Ignore all the clever names manufacturers come up with.  All the tuning rods converge at the spider which is attached to a central rod which is pulled down by the pedal arm.  Hence the name.
  21. Fine Tuner.  This changes location, on Premier drums it is called a crown wheel (probably because it looks like the Crown paint manufacturers logo).
  22. Tuning Rods.  These are the radial rods, the other ones are vertical rods.

…The Parts of a Drum

Every percussionist should know…
…what the various parts of a drum are called.

Searching on the web for an image to help identify the parts of a snare threw up an incredible amount of misinformation.  The image below is both clear, good and correct.

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