Tag: service

Premier 701 Vibraphone Overhaul (Job No: 1351)

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This is the second of the three Premier 701 vibraphones that I am simultaneously working on and is therefore episode two in the, “aging Premier vibes” mini series. If this blog determined what I do in my workshop, the first episode would be the last in the series as it is the youngest of the three vibes. However that is not how it happens, so this vibraphone is actually the oldest of the three.

The most obvious aesthetic difference of this vibe compared to the other two is that at this time Premier were still polishing the resonators. The motor unit has changed, gone is the two cone gearbox design with the push/pull rod that to change the speed (the gearbox that was forever breaking) replaced by a three stage pulley.

As intimated, losing the gearbox was probably done for reliability but we do start to see the introduction of cost savings and the loss of the gearbox would almost certainly have saved Premier a bob or two.

The external note rails were still being polished, but the inner two are now being painted. However the rest of the components are from the original patterns: black balls in the damper bar, white end pegs, and chunky fanshaft bushes.

When I overhaul vibraphones, my approach is to fix everything that I find wrong, striving to make the instrument better than it has ever been. This process takes time, sometimes even months of work as I deal with a long list of minutia. In an attempt to avoid repetition (although that is inevitable), I try to pick the pertinent aspects of the repair rather than me filming and writing, and you watching and reading the same thing every time. For the same reasons I have coloured this introductory text blue (aren’t I thoughtful!)


This Vibraphone is generally tired, after all it is getting old. As I well know, once you pass thirty your body starts to acquire various aches and pains, now passed forty I am well aware that my body just doesn’t work as well as it did. This vibe is older than me, so it is no wonder that it is falling apart.

As you know I started working on all the resonators which is mainly a job of cleaning up and replacing loose rivets, but there can be issues as seen in (Job No: 1354). On that instrument the whole row of tubes were out of alignment, whereas on this instrument the damage to one of the tubes was just cosmetic.

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Premier 701 Vibraphone Repair (Job No: 1354)

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Premier updated the 700 series vibraphone to the 701 series in 1963. There is no further differentiation in terms of model and serial numbers to go on to help determine the age of an instrument. Old spare parts manuals do provide a guide and put a time period around the type of motor used. However the problem is that Premier went through a development period where several different systems were employed, more than listed in the parts manuals.

I have three vibes in for repair, so I have taken the opportunity to look at the development of Premier’s vibraphone as well as discussing the repairs. Therefore this is the first of mini series, “Aging Premier Vibes”.

When I overhaul vibraphones, my approach is to fix everything that I find wrong, striving to make the instrument better than it has ever been. This process takes time, sometimes even months of work as I deal with a long list of minutia. In an attempt to avoid repetition (although that is inevitable), I try to pick the pertinent aspects of the repair rather than me filming and writing, and you watching and reading the same thing every time. For the same reasons I have coloured this introductory text blue (aren’t I thoughtful!)


The biggest problem that I have to fix on this vibraphone is the bent note rail. Premier 700 series vibraphones are meant to be packed away and carried from place to place. They are very good at being portable, in fact they are probably the most portable whilst still being easy to assemble. What they are not good at is being wheeled around whilst set up because they simply aren’t strong enough. The most common way that the note rails bend is downwards, caused by thoughtless dick heads who use the instrument as a convenient trolley to carry heavy objects like amplifiers. I have even seen them used as a bench for kids! In this instance there has been an impact from the side which has caused the bend.

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Premier 751 Vibraphone (Job No: 1327)

There are a lot of vibraphones coming through my workshop at the moment, including the Premier 751. In fact, when I pause to think about it, I seem to have been working continuously on various aspects of the Premier vibraphones for nearly a year now. Whether I have been developing moulds for reproducing the rubber parts, making jigs for the metal components, or working on whole new assemblies, there always seems to be something going on with these vibes.

What I find is that work comes in waves; for months all I seem to have worked on are vibes, before that I just seemed to be doing timpani, then I had three sets of tubular bells in a row… So this is what has happened, and the result is that my stock of parts is being used up. I keep stating that these parts are obsolete because the instrument isn’t produced any more, so now I have been forced to come up with alternative solutions which all take a lot of time over prolonged periods.

Instead of focusing on particular details, with this post I decided to give more of an overview of the work I do. What you will see in the video is that jobs are never as straight forward as you would think, and soon I find myself surrounded by bits…


Premier 750 Vibraphone (Job No: 1227)

There has been a little discussion on another blog post regarding the note pegs on this vibraphone, so I thought that it was about time that I wrote up the work I did to the last Premier 700 series vibraphone that came through my workshop.

Premier made the 750 series vibraphone from 1947 – 61, then updated the frame calling it the 701 from 1961 – 79. So I was 5 when the latest version of the Premier vibe was made, which is why I am slightly confused as to exactly what model this vibe is. Confusion is my normal state especially when it comes to Premier’s instruments, this looks like a 700 series, but with a new (at the time) pedal system. The 700 had a damper system with a central pull rod and a small toe pedal, which the became a long pedal attached to the same mechanism. The 750 has the re-designed pedal used on later vibes and a new motor. However I can’t remember how the top frame worked on the last 700 (with centre pull) I worked on, I think it was like this instrument.

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Although these weren’t the first vibraphone that Premier made, they are very old now.  This is not a bad thing, especially with vibraphones.  This is because of the aluminium that the notes are made from simply isn’t available now.  The two aspects of the material that have changed are, the recipe/purity of the alloy that is used and the treatment process it is subjected to.  Material science has moved on since the days when these instruments were made, and newer materials with more desirable properties to wider industry have been developed resulting in a lot of aluminium alloys and treatment process becoming obsolete.  Like most scenarios, what is good for the major consumers of materials is bad for musical applications.

So the note bars are great, but what is not so great about these 700 and 750 series vibes is just about everything else.  To make matters more difficult to discuss, like a lot of manufacturers during this period, instruments were being continually developed.  So there are several different versions of the 700 series which eventually became the 750 and then 701/751 which in turn went through several versions.  This evolution of instruments at Premier slowed down in the 1980s and eventually stopped in the early 1990s, obviously due to the key personnel leaving or retiring, and resulted in Premier’s orchestral range becoming dated which is a great shame, but that is progress, ultimately only the companies that specialise in selling high quantities of low quality instruments survive.  When will we ever learn?

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Anyway I digress as per usual.

The problems with these vibraphones is in the nature of how they are assembled and disassembled.  I still don’t really know the best way to go about it.  The central two note rails and the damper bar comprise one unit which is attached either end of both rails to the leg frames with four wing screws.  The same method is used to attach the outer two note rails, whereas the damper pedal is located on two plastic pegs and secured with “J” bolts as per the later vibes.  The challenge is to assemble the instrument out of all the components by yourself, if you succeed give yourself a pat on the back, you are better practised than I.  It is only after all the rails are in that everything can be tightened and the frame becomes more rigid, before that point the instrument is liable to collapse at any given moment.  If you try and cheat by tightening the screws too early you physically can’t get the other rails into the gap.  After the square is secure it is simple to fix the resonators with their diagonal braces, which ironically make the 700 series vibe more stable than the 751 series.  It is at this point that you will realise that you forgot to put the vibe belts around the inner two note rails, and you have to walk away, make a cup of tea and regroup.

Obviously there is nothing that I can do to repair the inherent design flaws and the subsequent frustrations incurred, my job is to make the instrument playable.  In order to play the instruments the notes need to be suspended off the frame, and this is another case of those perishing rubber note pegs. As can be seen from the photograph above, the rubber note pegs on this vibe are organised in pairs. The reasons for the rubber perishing is discussed in 1264: Premier Vibe Note Pegs, the approach to the repair on this vibe is also essentially the same, and indeed I did the two instruments concurrently. The main difference being that I made only one mould for each rail I needed to work on because these vibes come in to be repaired so infrequently. Typically, I now have more enquiries so I should have made more and not just thought of myself!

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(Photographic evidence that the instrument can indeed stand upright with only three note rails attached!)

The rest of the instrument, in terms of the overhaul, is very similar to all the other Premier vibraphones I seem to have been working on this year. The damper bar is the same as later models, as is the damper pedal with the exception that the 751 series vibraphones have two connecting rods which is preferable to the one that was on this 700 vibe. Had I had all the spare parts available, I would have modified this vibe to include that second connecting rod, but I didn’t, so I didn’t. The omission is not disastrous, just not ideal. When there is only one connecting rod, there is an inbalance in the damping system whereby the end without the connecting rod has a certain level of ambiguity in the damping. The ramifications are that I had to set the instrument up less precisely than I normal like to do. In normal circumstances I set the vibraphones up so that I can make the transition between fully damped/pedal up to fully open/pedal down within the flexure of my toes. On this instrument the ankle has to be used also.

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Of course a vibraphone made in the 1950/60’s will have no consideration to electrical safety. As can be seen, the flex has been condemned by someone who quite rightly cut it off, it is the old cloth wound flex after all. I updated the wiring to use an IEC15 plug and socket after determining that the motor did indeed still work even after all these years, and it passed the PAT test.

With the notes cleaned and re-strung, the resonators and butterflies serviced and cleaned, the end result is a nice, tidy, fully working instrument which sounded great.

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Deagan Aurora (part 3) (Job No: 1256)

It can be seen that I tend to employ a systematic approach to overhauling percussion instruments, and vibraphones in particular typify my methods.  Sometimes I deviate from the logical order of doing things, so in 1256: Deagan Aurora (pt 1) I looked at the damper system and in 1256: Deagan Aurora (pt 2) I looked at the whole frame.  This was just because of the way my working week fell – it was Friday late morning when I started looking at this vibraphone, and I didn’t want to immerse myself into a new project only to have to break off immediately, so I removed what I thought would have been a small element.  Anyway in this post I hope to finish the instrument by looking at the final three elements: the resonators, motor and notes.

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In the photograph above, the resonators on the left have yet to be done, whereas the resonators on the right are complete.  What doesn’t come out so well in the photos is just how dirty these resonators were.  Thankfully it was a nice summer day, so I sat outside with a bucket of hot soapy water and literally scrubbed them until they were clean, whilst hosing off the filth periodically to prevent it from baking back on.  And that was just the tubes.

The important thing about vibraphone resonators are the butterfly valves that rotate, opening and closing the tube.  The tube, as the name implies, is simply an acoustic chamber that resonates in sympathy with the second harmonic of the note under which it is hung.  As the butterfly valve is rotated it opens and closes this acoustic chamber so it cycles through being activated and therefore heard, then not.  This is what give the vibraphone its sound and presumably its name; although the name is misleading because I have no idea what the “vibra” stands for, because it is not vibrato.  It should be called an Oscillating Amplitude (Second Harmonic) Metalaphone which would have been way more cool.  Of course I could be showing my ignorance and the “vibra” could be an aspect of the inventors name as in Adolf Sax.

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The butterflies are attached to a fan shaft which runs down the length of the resonator tubes, and this shaft is driven typically by a belt connected to a motor via pulley wheels. There are other designs, but they are just marketing gimmicks that add needless complication into a simple and efficient system and demonstrate (to me) complete ignorance of the principles of mechanical engineering, a misunderstanding of the acoustics, a lack of consideration for the gigging musician, or a combination of all three. This design works, it has always worked; it is simple, rarely goes wrong, and is quick and easy to set up when assembling the instrument. I never understand why manufacturers can be bothered to put effort into developing an alternative system that ultimately is worse than the starting point unless it is simply to give them something to talk about when they are trying to sell the instruments. My “USP” is that it sounds good, oh and it has a life time guarantee.

Because the fan shaft is so long, it needs to be supported, certainly at either end, but also in one or two other places. It is these supporting bushes that introduce noise into the system, and of course that noise is amplified through the resonator tubes. I often have to make up new bushes to replace parts that are damaged or simply missing as was the case on this Deagan vibraphone.

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All of this cleaning, making parts, repairing and polishing fan shafts, aligning, etc all takes time time, and unfortunately there really is no short cut; cutting corners results in a noisy system. So after all of this work, the next stage is the motor. This is where things went wrong for me. The problem is that I am damned if I do and damned if I don’t. Because the motors are generally very old, they are really dirty and essentially operating under a 15 tog duvet of dust which means that everything gets very hot – not good. However, because everything has been getting very hot for a very long time, all the wires are extremely brittle and on the very edge of breaking down – also not good. So if I leave things alone the motor will fail and if I try and clean and service it, the motor could fail. The final element is the wiring; because the motors are invariably very old, health and safety simply was not even taken into consideration. Today things are different, I simply cannot let an electric appliance leave my workshop if I know it to be unsafe – regardless of legislation on a personal level I will not let people expose themselves to life threatening dangers in ignorance. However there is legislation and appliances need to be inspected by a qualified person, and if the wiring is dangerous, then it fails the test and legally cannot be allowed to be used.

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So all I did was to put on a strain relief system. This meant desoldering wires, threading new cables through and reconnecting. After my intention was to blank off the exposed components. This minor bit of work introduced an inconsistent fault, which, whilst trying to identify gradually became less inconsistent until it achieved permanent. Ultimately, a decision has to be made – is it really worth spending time and effort trying to fix a motor that is forty years old? The answer is no.

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The final stage of the overhaul is to clean the notes. Finger grease, beer, sweat, spittle, smoke, etc multiplied by years equals a nasty film of crud that inhibits the notes from vibrating. Unless I have be asked to tune or refinish the notes, it just a case of cleaning it all off which requires more time and elbow grease. The results however are rewarding; not only do they look a lot better, they sound so much better and respond when played. When the whole instrument is assembled and clean notes go on it is like the icing on the cake, although it is the notes that are at the very heart of the instrument. But this is not unusual, it is the same with all instruments: for instance the strings on a violin, guitar or piano make the vibrations, but it is how the rest of the instrument utilises those vibrations that is important.


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Premier 751 Vibraphone (part 1) (Job No: 1279)

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Here is a Premier 751 Vibraphone in a bit of a state, sent in to me to be made usable.  Whenever I get an instrument like any of the Premier 7 series vibes, I always ask how the instrument used.  This is because I have invariably seen the same model instrument many times before and have a good knowledge how they break.  For example, the resonators on the 751 (or 701) vibraphone are fixed in two points at the low end, but at the high end there is no mechanical fixing, they simply rest on a transom.  Using gravity is fine on most instruments for holding resonators in place because of their mass, but to then expect gravity to be a structural component of an instrument’s design and resist the much larger forces of motion and mechanics is simply ridiculous.  And yet I see it used all the time, by every manufacturer and even overlooked in most renovations, which is how I have come to the conclusion that either nobody knows what they are doing, or that they are making things to fail to generate future income.

So to get back to this vibraphone, what has resulted is that when viewed from above, the frame has become rhomboid and when viewed from the front it has become trapezoid.  If this frame distortion is ignored, the instrument will eventually just die, but with a simple sub frame the problems can be rectified.  The frames I make have a life time guarantee, that’s my lifetime, not the life time of a product (which is up to the moment it breaks), so essentially they are extremely strong, strong enough to be used to pull a frame back into alignment as opposed to just retaining it in a distorted shape.  Alignment of an instrument is very important for longevity, especially when there are moving components like on a vibraphone.

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Everyone has a method of working, I start at both ends; from the ground up and the top down.  What I am doing is working from the known points and verifying that those datum lines are correct.  By the ground up I mean the contact with the floor, and the top down is the players interaction.  In order to get fit a subframe to Premier vibes it is necessary to remove the two lower transoms, this makes it easier to also fit new casters.

Another constantly recurring problem with most percussion instruments is the material used to make the frame out of.  Aluminium is used because it is “light weight”, but it only saves weight if the component is designed properly to overcome its low strength, mostly manufacturers just use more of it to add strength which is expensive and heavier than steel.  Premier have deviated from the norm and actually used an extrusion; all the little grooves massively increasing the components bending resistance.  Where the casters are bolted on, Premier have even used the plastic end cap as an internal support to the tube to resist the tube crushing and wear on bolt holes.  In fact on most of the Premier vibraphones I see, it is the steel note rails and not the aluminium that is visibly bent.

However, the problem I encounter when modifying an aluminium frame is holding the fixings in place.  To simply drill a hole and put a steel bolt through is never going to last; the aluminium extrusion will compress introducing a gap, therefore movement, and therefore wear on the holes thus rendering the whole exercise a complete waste of time, effort and the customers money.  This means that I have to make a whole range of subsidiary components to support the bolts which will affix the proposed frame modification, which takes careful thought, time and always some compromises to keep the ultimate cost down.

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The final subframe looks very simple, but it is doing many jobs:  It holds the four casters parallel to the ground, fixes the width of the instrument, pushes the back two casters outwards to remove the frame twist, pulls the frame back square so that the note bed is horizontal, and holds it there during use of the damper pedal, and finally it increases the structural strength of the whole vibraphone so that it can withstand being wheeled around the buildings where it lives and is played.  Like all my solutions, I use the minimum number of wing nuts to reduce the players time when setting up or packing down; three nuts and the legs can be folded away.  The only downside is that one has another component to carry, but only because I retained the original pedal bar to save money.

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With the frame problems now rectified I turn my attention to the next area, and look at the damper bar.  It is immediately apparent that there is a problem – one of the leaf springs has broken.  They always break, the constant bending work hardens the steel making it increasingly brittle until it snaps.  The thread in the plastic ball is stripped, and the ball is cracked.  The felt is more like carpet than felt, and the bar itself is bent.  Each of these problems can be repaired, but then you would still be left with an ineffectual damper system which has components that are prone to failure, and that is not what my customers want back as a completely refurbished instrument.  Additionally my aim is always to return instruments that will give years if not decades of use.

Having made a new damper system recently on another vibraphone (1260: 701 vibe damper (pt 2)), it was a good opportunity to repeat the process.  I am constantly reviewing how I do things and looking for improvements, or developing methods to make the process quicker and cheaper without compromising quality.  This was no exception, I tweaked a few aspects of the design and the construction but essentially it is the same as before.  By increasing the width of the bar I have increased the surface area of the note in contact with the felt which results in much better damping.  On an operational level, because the bar is hinged, and because I have designed it, there is minimal horizontal travel as the bar travels through its arc.  The original design, because of the leaf springs, shifts left to right as the bar is pulled down and up; this lateral movement not only drags the notes around, but from a musical perspective it creates woolliness in the damping.

The original Premier damper system, is an ugly, inelligent and inefficient design solution that I would never have been happy with, but that is essentially my gripe with most instruments and all of the brand manufactures; they put into production badly designed products which are then made cheaply and badly, and endorsed by high profile musicians.  Even worse, a high profile musician “designs” and markets a new instrument.  Whilst musicians know when they are playing on a nice instrument, they generally have very little idea as to what makes the instrument good besides the obvious.  I have spent decades learning about materials, mechanical engineering, acoustics, etc, and I have more questions than ever.  It’s like the drummer that wants to be a front man – the musician that wants to make instruments.  Why don’t they start with something easier to understand and simpler to make like a violin or a guitar for their private enjoyment?

This repair continues in 1279: Premier 751 (pt 2)

Premier Concert Timps (Job No: 1246)

When I overhaul a set of timps, there is a lot of work involved over a period of days or even weeks. My approach is to fix everything properly; I am after all a professional and that is what I am being paid to do. However not everyone is as conscientious, and in the end, you get what you pay for. So when I work on timpani, I am fixing problems associated with wear and tear, and the dogs dinner that the previous person made of the job. The posts on timpani pick out examples of problems I encounter, rather than me writing, and you reading the same thing every time I do a set of timpani (which is why I have coloured this bit blue).

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So I did the usual process on this pair of drums: strip everything off the drum, so that whilst the castings are being welded I can work on the mechanisms.

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Then after the base castings are back and painted I can get straight into the rebuild and setup.  At the end of the rebuild, the bowls go in, and the heads are put on.  I usually do the counter hoops with the mechanism, so the bowls are the last thing I look at.

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Which is why it is so annoying when the PTFE tape is removed from the rim to reveal big bloody holes!

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As you can see above, these holes are deep, also notice how dry the glass fibres are (I’m lifting them up with the Stanley knife).  If you zoom in on the photo, you can see that there is a gap between the outer layers, and inner layers.  In fact, large areas were cracked and had to be removed, so the bowl ended up looking like this:

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So is this Premier not making the bowls properly, or customer damage?  Well it is a bit of both.  Yes it took a bit of abuse to actually break the outer layers into the void, but there should be no void in the first place!  If I had made these drums, even if, like these they were made in the mid to late 1980’s, I would repair them free of charge under “my lifetime guarantee” because they clearly were badly made.
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And finally, above is a very dusty, but repaired bowl.  Now I can finish the job and put the heads on, grrrr!

Premier Pro Symphonic Timps (Job No: 1209)

Premier Pro symphonic timpani are just like elites but with a standard collar. Gibberish! Elites are top of Premier’s range of timpani, they have a fine tuning wheel under the bowl, and the counter hoop is three inches oversized, meaning three inches bigger than the bowl. This is the extended collar. Therefore the Pro symphonic timps are identical with the exception that the counter hoop is only one inch bigger than the bowl, which is referred to as “standard”. The use of the term collar originates from the days when calfskin was predominantly used on drums, and it is the amount the head is stretched down below the bearing edge.

When I overhaul a set of timps, there is a lot of work involved over a period of days or even weeks. My approach is to fix everything properly; I am after all a professional and that is what I am being paid to do. However not everyone is as conscientious, and in the end, you get what you pay for. So when I work on timpani, I am fixing problems associated with wear and tear, and the dogs dinner that the previous person made of the job. The posts on timpani pick out examples of problems I encounter, rather than me writing, and you reading the same thing every time I do a set of timpani (which is why I have coloured this bit blue).

The heel on the base casting is prone to wear. It is the third point of contact the the floor, the other two being the casters, so when the drums are moved the heel can drag. As the heel wears away the tuning mechanism beneath the base casting starts to foul against the floor, which obviously is a problem. Easy fix, just screw a bit of something to the underside of the heel. And this is what happens to that solution:

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As can be seen, one has survived, one has fallen off leaving steel spikes, and one has been gone so long the steel spikes have worn completely away. A 30% success rate is just not acceptable to me, neither is having those steel spikes! Why have they come off? The answer is simple, the repairer didn’t know what they were doing. As the plastic heel drags on the floor it is applying a sheer force to the screws, and screws are very weak in that direction, so they “sheer” off. Secondly, plastic is softer than aluminium, so it is never going to last (durr)!

So the first major obstacle is trying to get the sheered, hard steel screws out of the soft aluminium which is not easy, and can sometimes take an hour. A frustrating, horrible job. Then I have a new block of aluminium, to bring the thickness back to original, welded to the castings.

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From the top side, it can be seen that the heat from the welding burns the paint.

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Which is then cleaned up and masked off, ready to be painted.

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As the drums are moved about, the struts can work loose, so they need to be tightened up. This requires a bit of feel – it is a steel screw into an aluminium casting, and aluminium doesn’t hold a thread very well. I commonly find screws that have stripped their threads due to being overtightened. Now sometimes I strip a thread, but I replace the bolts. The problem is exacerbated by the wrong bolts being fit in the first instance – Yes that is a manufacturing defect regardless of age. Because I am a genius, I buy the longest screws that fit!

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As Premier were developing the timpani various improvements were made. One issue was that on the larger drums, the heads were at such low tension, they had insufficient power to lift the pedal mechanism. Other manufacturers have a balanced action to overcome this problem. Premier went the same route and fit a spring to help lift the pedal. This is seen between the mechanism and casting on the left hand side.
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This spring was also insufficient in power, so a more powerful spring was fit in a new place. This is what I have retro fitted to this mechanism.
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The casters that are fit to Premier timpani don’t work. The route cause of the problem is that the casting was designed at least forty years ago for casters which have long since become obsolete. It is the brake lever on new casters that catch the frame. Premier fit spacers to lift the casters (bad idea from a mechanical engineering standpoint) and even ground away part of the casting.

Being a self proclaimed genius I use casters that fit, and they are the same as used on ludwig drums. However they are not available in europe, so I have to import them by the hundred. Once I have converted the drums to accept them, replacing the casters can be done by the customer.
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Premier Glockenspiel (part 3) (Job No: 1226)

This post continues from 1226: Premier Glock (part 2) and started in 1226: Premier Glock (part 1)

The base board gets a fresh coat of black, whilst the frame has its third coat of varnish.
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The whole lot is then glued and screwed together.
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Now I cut the new felt, gather all the note pegs I will need and re-assemble the whole glockenspiel.
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Above is a picture of the instrument back in its case.  I am very pleased with the end result.  Notice the extra note on the accidentals – this is a high E flat I made in 1220: Glockenspiel Notes

Premier 751 Vibraphone (Job No: 1179)

A Premier 751 vibraphone in to have a service.  Particular issues are inconsistent damping and note sustain.

A quick look at the frame revealed no major issues, however the fan shafts were very noisy, so I started here.
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The Premier 751 Vibe is no longer made, so all spare parts are now obsolete.  When Premier stopped making this vibraphone, I was invited over to buy all the remaining spares.  Therefore if I don’t have it, then its unlikely that anyone else will – unless of course that they don’t do many of these very common vibes!

One of the problems with the fan shafts being noisy is the central bearing (pictured above).  In order to get this on the fan shaft (because it can’t go past the butterflies), the top of the bearing is sliced through, therefore it loses structural rigidity.  This becomes a real problem when it is forced into the resonators; forced because they were made a little bit too long, so they have to be bent to get them in.  The same thing happens at the low end, but there the bearing doesn’t have to be cut.  This bend creates a pinch point on the rotating shaft, and an ambiguity in positioning, this is where the noise comes from.  Thankfully because these spare have run out, I now have no option but to make a replacement, which means that I may as well solve the problem permanently.

First on the list of improvements is better material, I use a low friction nylon.  I would have used PTFE, but in
this instance it needs to hold a thread.  The originals are moulded plastic, so they start with a structure and add bits to the design for strength, because mine are cut from a sheet of material, I start with a block and remove bits where needed, but there is still a big increase in mass.  Therefore mine are way stronger than they need to be (which means that they should never need changing).

There is of course another benefit.  These bearings are now made when needed, and modified so that the holes are all aligned correctly so that the fan shaft runs true.  They are essentially matched sets.

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The central bearing is made in two halves and held together with machine screws, but all of the bearings have a little hole for oiling.  This is the complete opposite to progress – I have copied a concept used on vibes made in the 1930’s in the UK (where we invented engineering and are still unsurpassed), all I have done is used modern materials.

The only problem is that they don’t fit!  I went through several designs a few years ago, trying to make them so that would go in the space available, but they all failed.  Since then, I decided simply to increase the available space.  This means cutting the resonator tubes, and unlike every other time I have seen a tube modified, I remove the tubes from the set to work on them and not damage all the others.  It’s a no brainer!

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As can be seen above, I have increased the chord length of the cut out, and its depth.