Tag: vibe motor

Premier 701 Vibraphone Overhaul (Job No: 1351)

IMG_20160411_154751

This is the second of the three Premier 701 vibraphones that I am simultaneously working on and is therefore episode two in the, “aging Premier vibes” mini series. If this blog determined what I do in my workshop, the first episode would be the last in the series as it is the youngest of the three vibes. However that is not how it happens, so this vibraphone is actually the oldest of the three.

The most obvious aesthetic difference of this vibe compared to the other two is that at this time Premier were still polishing the resonators. The motor unit has changed, gone is the two cone gearbox design with the push/pull rod that to change the speed (the gearbox that was forever breaking) replaced by a three stage pulley.

As intimated, losing the gearbox was probably done for reliability but we do start to see the introduction of cost savings and the loss of the gearbox would almost certainly have saved Premier a bob or two.

The external note rails were still being polished, but the inner two are now being painted. However the rest of the components are from the original patterns: black balls in the damper bar, white end pegs, and chunky fanshaft bushes.

When I overhaul vibraphones, my approach is to fix everything that I find wrong, striving to make the instrument better than it has ever been. This process takes time, sometimes even months of work as I deal with a long list of minutia. In an attempt to avoid repetition (although that is inevitable), I try to pick the pertinent aspects of the repair rather than me filming and writing, and you watching and reading the same thing every time. For the same reasons I have coloured this introductory text blue (aren’t I thoughtful!)


This Vibraphone is generally tired, after all it is getting old. As I well know, once you pass thirty your body starts to acquire various aches and pains, now passed forty I am well aware that my body just doesn’t work as well as it did. This vibe is older than me, so it is no wonder that it is falling apart.

As you know I started working on all the resonators which is mainly a job of cleaning up and replacing loose rivets, but there can be issues as seen in (Job No: 1354). On that instrument the whole row of tubes were out of alignment, whereas on this instrument the damage to one of the tubes was just cosmetic.

PhotoGrid_1462865351471

Premier Vibe Motor Conversion (Job No: 1101)

wpid-img_20140619_125711.jpg

This is a replacement motor unit made for a Premier 751 vibraphone.  The on/off switch, and potentiometer are on fly leads so that they can be fit either side of the leg hinge, on the underside of the high end transom.  The grey box contains the speed control PCB, capacitor, and various connectors, with an IEC socket fitted so that the power cable can be removed.

The motor carriage is made to fit 750 & 751 vibes, but will probably fit older models.  Like everything I make, it has been designed to overcome problems that I have had to repair many times.  This carriage is not only strong enough to actually hold the motor, but will actually stiffen the note rails and their joining piece.

Locating the pot and on/off switch to the end frame avoids the normal difficulties experienced when bowing the notes, and the leg hinge will offer protection to the components during transportation.

The grey box is the brains.  The IEC socket was a moment of realisation during conversation with the customer.  By using a standardised socket as opposed to permanently wired, prevents straining or damaging the cable which occurs when winding it around the instrument, and makes replacement simple.  In fact finding a replacement cable on a gig is now simplicity; just borrow the cable one powering the kettle, or pc, or guitar amp, etc, etc.  Additionally, there is now no need for anyone other than myself to open that grey box!  Finally, there are two small holes on the side, the small one is the power led on the PCB, the larger one is access for the trimming pot which can be used to increase the maximum speed, so can be ignored.

To fit it, six holes need to be drilled, four for the motor carriage and one each for the pot and power switch. Then its just a matter of routing the cable.